Posts by johneinarsen

Excerpts from Whisper of the Land

“Let the photo-taking sessions be a ballet instead of a military-style attack or a grueling marathon. In the garden, drink the sun, sweep with the wind, sing like a bird, and dance with a shovel and a rake.”

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Picaro Rising

Picaro Rising   REVIEW BY DAVID COZY   Running Through Beijing by Xu Zechen. Translated by Eric Abrahamsen. San Francisco: Two Lines Press, 161 pp., $12.95 (paper).   
 n China’s major cities there is an elite one percent or so that drive nice cars, eat in nice restaurants, and generally live pleasant lives. They…

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Poetry and Prose, Mirrors and Distance

Poetry and Prose, Mirrors and Distance     Poems of a Penisist by Mutsuo Takahashi. Translated by Hiroaki Sato. Twelve Views from the Distance by Mutsuo Takahashi. Translated by Jeffrey Angles. REVIEW BY GREGORY DUNNE     he University of Minnesota has recently published two remarkable volumes of Japanese literature in translation by one of…

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Nature and Spirit Reunion

REVIEW BY BRIAN COVERT

“There is much work to be done—not only in “saving the Earth,” as the mantra of the environmental movement goes, but also in saving ourselves and our own souls in the process.”

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Far From Home

REVIEW BY KEN RODGERS

“The novel hinges on Rashomon-like multiple takes on the hellish circumstances in which one individual prisoner was beaten to death”

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INTERNSHIPS AT KYOTO JOURNAL

          Internships at Kyoto Journal     Everyone who works on KJ is an unpaid volunteer. This is a key aspect of KJ. It’s collaborative, focused — and fun. Whatever your personal interests and skills, there are a multitude of ways that you can contribute. We especially look for interns who…

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Eye-witness News, Revisited

Memories have inevitably faded during the 25 years that have passed since the tragic end of the 1989 Tiananmen student protests, and for the younger generation in China, it’s hardly even a blip in the country’s historical flow to present-day prosperity.

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On Constitutional Revision and Peacekeeping

Based on my experience the older generation, those who experienced WWII directly, fall into two groups. One is characterized by strong anti-military, anti-war sentiment: “We have to maintain the Peace Constitution; never again such a terrible war.” Others believe that WWII was a kind of defensive war… the U.S. and European countries were colonialist, and Japan liberated the Asian nations.

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The Unyielding

Okamoto began to write prose of lyrical and, at times, hyperbolic intensity, exploring modernist concepts of the artist and/or the individual in collision with society, spiritual alienation, and the moral, ethical, and political dilemma of the abandonment of tradition.

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Mishima: Creation, Love, Patriotism, Death

Persona is like a flashcard pastiche, much of it based on interviews and private correspondence fused with the historical events through which Mishima moved. Mishima’s lifelong obsession with death and suicide and his sensational death by seppuku at forty-five, haunts the biography.

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Gorazd Vilhar’s Japan

  VILHAR’S BOOKS   MATSURI: World of Japanese Festivals Shufunotomo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, 1994. Currently out of print. Used copies available online.   KYOTO: A Cultural Sojourn Yohan, 1998. IBC Publishing, 2013, Tokyo.   GRACIOUS GIFTS: Japan’s Sacred Offerings Shufunotomo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, 1999. Currently out of print. Used copies available online.   TOKYO TOKYO…

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Teahouse Renaissance in Taipei

Wisteria was the first intellectual style teahouse, and created a quiet, clean place to focus on drinking tea. Outside the wood and paper walls of the two-story Japanese house was a garden with bamboo and a koi pond.

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The Name Game

Winnie Yu

For the Chinese understand that without nature, man is inherently insignificant. It is therefore understandable that of all of the thousands of teas in China, none were specifically named after a person, not even after any of the many emperors who were often responsible for naming them.

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