Posts by lucinda

Poetry, Love, Enlightenment

POET
BY RASOUL SORKHABI

Eight hundred years ago, in a northeastern town of the Persian kingdom, a boy was born. When he was twelve years old, he chanced to meet the great Sufi master and Persian poet Attar, who told the boy’s father: “The fiery words of this boy will kindle the souls of lovers all over the world.”

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The Hermit Experience

BY LAUREN W. DEUTSCH

EDWARD A. BURGER found his teacher, Master Guangkuan, in the Zhongnan Mountains in the winter of 1999. He completed his first documentary, Amongst White Clouds, about Zhongnan Mountain hermits in 2005…

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The Wrong Paradise

SHORT STORY
BY RABINDRANATH TAGORE

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), the first Asian to win a Nobel Prize, is widely considered the greatest Bengali poet of all time. He is certainly one of the finest writers of the world in the past century….

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Little Soman’s Little War

AFGHANISTAN
BY KEITH HARMON SNOW

Dead army tanks are everywhere here. One supposes they are dead. There are dead tanks in villages, sunk in streams, crossing fields, sleeping on hills, burrowing into the wind-swept land like crabs at the beach.

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Gion Geisha

INTERVIEW BY IAN PERLMAN

Yoshida Teruko is a former geiko (often called geisha outside of Kyoto). She is the proprietor of a bar in the Gion district whose clientele includes corporate leaders from Kyoto, Tokyo and other countries.

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War, Crisis and News in Korea

REVIEW BY ERIC JOHNSTON

After Japan colonized Korea in 1910, the journalistic record would, over the next few decades, be tightly controlled by Japanese censors, further contributing to Korea’s sense of isolation from the outside world. That would begin to change after the Second World War…

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Trajectories of War

REVIEW BY KEN RODGERS

Published more than sixty years since the end of World War II, this painstakingly-researched account of the downing of an American B-29 by anti-aircraft fire over Niigata City in July 1945 has a distinctly Rashomon-like quality, incorporating multiple viewpoints, both American and Japanese…

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Stories of Forgetting, Remembering and Ritual

REVIEW BY VINITA RAMANI MOHAN

How do you deal with trauma until this or that civil society organization and tribunal comes to you with promises to heal your wounds? Mãnoa’s Maps of Reconciliation is a compendium of writings and images that grapple with this very difficult question.

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Tea Tourism and Trade

Reviews BY LAUREN W. DEUTSCH

In addition to promoting stunningly beautiful rows of tea bushes and romantic “exotic” peoples, there’s money to be made welcoming eco-tourists to stalk wild tea plants, visit plantations, gardens, processing facilities, markets and auctions.

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Tea and Women’s Empowerment

REVIEWS BY LAUREN W. DEUTSCH

“Coffee–table” books about tea tend to offer pristine views of paradise and bowls of world peace. Page after page of steamy shadows and shadowy steam, dewy landscapes fashioned by gods with impeccable taste, a solitary red maple leaf or cherry blossom petal captured mid-fall, fresh green tea froth (or sludge, depending upon your “school”) glaring up through ceramic ensos like the third eye of the Wizard of Oz. Enough!

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The Books of Tea

REVIEWS BY LAUREN W. DEUTSCH

Books on, about and of tea are as many and varied as the infusion of two leafs and a bud of camellia sinensis into a beverage. To that end, I offer the same configuration of tea tomes in review: a classic and a new volume. The “bud” has yet to be written.

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The Glass Room

INTERVIEW BY JOHN EINARSEN

One enormous bowl, by contemporary American glass artist Dalie Chihuly, glows from a showcase beneath a transparent floor of glass. Frothy green tea is served to visitors in 19th century glass bowls from Italy. The keeper of the glass room is the shrine’s former head priest, 76 year-old Torii Hiroyoshi.

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Left Behind in Japan

ONLINE FEATURE BY CLIVE FRANCE

Japan is the only G8 member besides Russia not to have signed the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, a multilateral treaty “that provides an expeditious method to return a child internationally abducted from one member nation to another.”

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Washi Emporium

FROM KYOTO SPEAKS

Mori Yasutaka was the executive director of Morita Wagami. He has produced several books including an immense Encyclopedia of Hand-made Japanese Paperwhich was presented to the Emperor Showa.

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Vegetarian Survival in Kyoto

Vegetarian Survival in Kyoto Kyoto offers a great choice of restaurants for vegetarians and vegans. Here is a list of some of our favourites, as well as some websites and blogs to aid you in your search. Deep Kyoto – Excellent local info including listing of vegetarian restaurants and import foodstores, more restaurants here, vegan…

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All the Times in the World

BY PICO IYER

Time…is one of those currencies we exchange every time we cross a border. An hour in Japan (where everything is clockbound, and even televisions show the hour) is equivalent to a day in laid-back India…

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Emperor Meiji’s Clock Poem

TRANSLATION
BY HAROLD WRIGHT

TOKEI
Kazuamata
kakeshi tokei no
kotogotoku
Kuruwanu oto no
kokochi yoki kana.

This poem is a tanka by the Emperor Meiji, 122nd Emperor of Japan, who reigned from 1868 to 1912, when Japan began its modern explosion towards the modern world.

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Going Geisha

SOCIETY
BY NOY THRUPKAEW

After returning from Japan, I was surprised to see that the States was in a lather over “geisha chic.” Chopsticks were stuck in heads fair and dark. Fashion magazines urged women to “Geisha-ize”…

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Qi in the Arts of China

ART
BY ZHANG YU HUAN AND KEN ROSE

Chinese art emphasizes the expression of motion and strength. This vital dynamism arises from the ancient dialectical unity: substantial and insubstantial; movement and stillness; firmness and softness; gathering and dispersal.

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Bright Road

BY ROBERT BRADY

In the beginning was the yearning — to seek what could be sought, find what could be found, learn what could be known — to go beyond mountains, know beyond deserts, discover beyond oceans…

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