INSIGHTS FROM ASIA

A Distant Flickering Light: The Hibakusha Peace Movement

August 7, 2018

Mrs. Koko Kondo showing the manuscript written by her father, Reverend Kiyoshi Tanimoto, that inspired John Hersey’s classic, Hiroshima. Do you think the Hibakusha are still important? They are still very important. This is because those individuals of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are the only humans who have ever experienced and survived a nuclear bombing. That…

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Reflections on the Singapore Summit

July 12, 2018

This interview was conducted in the early afternoon of June 12, 2018 while the United States-North Korean Summit was taking place in Singapore. Would you please express your overall view of the significance of the Singapore Summit, which is being conducted as we speak? The Singapore Summit meeting between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un is…

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oranguatan rescued palm oil plantation

Rescuing and Protecting Sumatra’s Critically Endangered Orangutans

February 20, 2018

The Orangutan Information Center (OIC) is a trail-blazing organization constituted of a team of dedicated Indonesian conservationists and veterinarians determined to save the critically endangered Sumatran orangutan from a host of threats…

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mongolia invasions of japan kyoto journal

Formative Memory: The Thirteenth-century Mongolian Invasions and their Impact on Japan

April 26, 2017

The second Mongolian invasion of Japan was like a sequel to a blockbuster movie; bigger in scale, larger cast, bigger budget, and the same director (Kublai Khan).

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Unbridled Perception

September 13, 2016

The founders of the Miksang Institute for Contemplative Photography bring their practice to Asia with a pioneering workshop in Japan.

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Tibetan Butter Tea and Pink Gin: Life in Old Darjeeling

September 5, 2015

My grandmother compiled a cookbook, written out in a foolscap quarto notebook in her small, neat hand. It had recipes for everything from aloo dhum potato curry to hot ale punch to American fudge, and included meal plans and guest lists…

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Remembering the 2004 Tsunami

December 16, 2014

My friends and I fled the approaching wave in a mad scramble up a dense jungle hill, and during the hours that followed it seemed that the world as we knew it had ended.

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Teahouse Renaissance in Taipei

May 13, 2014

Wistaria was the first intellectual style teahouse, and created a quiet, clean place to focus on drinking tea. Outside the wood and paper walls of the two-story Japanese house was a garden with bamboo and a koi pond.

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We Promise to Fix it Back

December 27, 2013

Will this catastrophe in Japan change us and lead to a more innovative, caring and interconnected way of living? Will the outbreaks of altruism and civic enthusiasm propel us to take similar steps? Will we demand ingenious forms of accountability?

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Buddhism and the Film

March 2, 2013

There would on the surface be little to connect the Buddhist faith with the cinema. This is an entertainment which is largely based upon satisfying our desire for the various attachments which Buddhism counsels us to give up. There are, however, a few promising areas where some agreement might be detected.

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Jiseung: A Journey into the Korean Art of Weaving Paper

January 5, 2013

For months, I was at a loss about how to weave so tightly. Then, one day he pressed my thumb down with such force, I felt like a door had smashed it. Only then did I grasp his secret…

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Mayumi Oda on Energy of Change, Feminization and New Birth of Japan

June 25, 2012

Mayumi Oda has devoted more than fifty years of her life to her art…her deeply feminist viewpoint also drives her ongoing efforts to promote world peace and eliminate nuclear weapons and other nuclear threats.

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Into Dasht-e Kavir: Notes From the Great Salt Desert

June 8, 2012

I stare at the barren oatmeal, forbidding life, eroded by the elements, its own self-loathing nature…

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“The Things We’ve Gone Through Together”: Children orphaned by AIDS build a loving family in rural Cambodia

December 26, 2011

I have come as a volunteer from the United States, to live with children orphaned by the AIDS epidemic that has raged in Cambodia since the 1990s…

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Morimoto Kikuo: Resurrecting a Cultural Ecology

December 11, 2011

The Khmer Rouge willfully tried to strip the nation of its rich culture and heritage. The casualty Japanese expat Morimoto Kikuo is trying his hardest to save is Cambodia’s traditional art of silk weaving and dyeing…

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Fujiko Hemming, Deaf Pianist

October 26, 2011

After Toako showed her how to decipher the squiggles on the scores, Fujiko was enchanted with the magic she could conjure, but she soon shriveled under her mother’s blistering criticism and the relentless repetition…

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Synthetic Dreams: The Art of Mariko Mori

August 20, 2011

Mariko Mori’s themes are eclectic, embracing the fantasies of post-everything Japan and its extreme experimentation while recontextualizing traditional customs, mannerisms, and trends…

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A Princess Ever, an Empress Never?

June 20, 2011

These days, a woman probably has more prospects of flying to the moon than becoming a titled member of one of the few remaining royal families, whose duties are much less glamorous…

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Urban Nomads

June 8, 2011

Nomads in Mongolia are increasingly quitting the land and opting for a new life in the country’s capital, Ulaanbaatar…the underlying causes are political, economic, legal, and cultural.

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MA: Place, Space, Void

May 16, 2011

Place is the product of lived space and lived time, a reflection of our states of mind and heart…

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Insider Outsider: The Way of the Yakuza

April 17, 2011

During my first interviews, O-oyabun was particularly eager to talk about ideology: The ‘Way of the Yakuza,’ ‘violating the law’ or ‘doing wrong things.’

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